The Parkway Vet Blog

FDA Cracks Down

The Food and Drug Administration ordered 14 companies to stop making fraudulent claims about cancer cures and warned consumers that such products are untested and possibly dangerous. (Andrew Harnik/AP)

Asparagus extract. Exotic teas. Topical creams for your pet — and you. These and dozens of other products are being touted falsely as having “anti-cancer” properties, according to federal regulators who are trying to stop the practice.

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How Dogs’ Sensitive Noses Could Change Cancer Diagnosis

 
If you could “see” a smell, it would look something like a drop of food coloring dispersing through a cup of water with intense knots in some places and misty tendrils around the borders. Olfaction scientists call these “odor landscapes”—it’s why sometimes you get a whiff of a nasty smell while your cubiclemate sits blissfully unaware. Moving through these odor landscapes with a human nose is relatively unremarkable. Unless you’re near a bakery or a dirty diaper, a perfume counter or a freshly varnished bookcase, you’re unlikely to notice the many scent fields continuously curling and colliding around you.

Money Tips for Caring Pet Owners

Everyone is trying to save money these days, including pet owners. But in an effort to cut back on costs, you may hear advice that could end up compromising your pet’s health. Regardless of what you read, providing your pet with regular preventive care is the key to a healthy and long life for your pet. And an investment in preventive healthcare can reduce your long-term pet healthcare costs. How? Preventive care does just what its name suggests – it can prevent diseases that can put your pet’s life in jeopardy and be costly to treat. Regular exams also often catch budding health issues that can become bigger problems if left untreated, saving you hundreds – or even thousands – of dollars as a result and possibly even saving the life of your pet.

Smokers Unleash Harms on Their Pets

 

SUNDAY, Jan. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Secondhand smoke not only harms people, it also poses a danger to dogs, cats and other pets, a veterinarian warns.

“If 58 million non-smoking adults and children are exposed to tobacco smoke, imagine how many pets are exposed at the same time,” said Dr. Carmela Stamper, who’s with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Why Are Salt Lamps Bad For Cats?

You Should Be Super Careful If You Have One In Your Home

If you’re a cat owner, then you only want the best for your furry friend (even if they’re not always ~the most~ adept at reciprocating the feeling). There are plenty of things you do on a day-to-day basis to keep your cat safe, but some of the risks posed to cats are subtler than others. For instance, you may not have known that there is a very specific reason why salt lamps are bad for cats, and any cat owners should be very cautious before bringing them into a home where a cat is present.

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Monkeys and dogs judge humans by how they treat others

Be nice – or your dog may judge you. Both pets and monkeys show a preference for people who help others, and this might explain the origins of our sense of morality.

Studies involving babies have previously shown that by the age of one, humans are already starting to judge people by how they interact. This has led to suggestions that children have a kind of innate morality that predates their being taught how to behave.

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Ambition Comes True at Animal Care Group

ACGLO

Dr. Greg Takashima had long planned to build a new kind of animal medical facility in Lake Oswego, and now he has one at the Animal Care Group of Lake Oswego.

However, as it turned out, Takashima has gotten an animal medical center that has far exceeded his original plans. Instead of just having a bigger, better version of Parkway Veterinary Hospital, which he founded 27 years ago in Lake Oswego, Takashima has been joined by five other animal medical treatment specialists.

Read More from the LO Review here+

Dr. Takashima Published In International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Jordan greets “Jenna” and walks with her as a first step to recovery.

Setting the One Health Agenda and the Human-Companion Animal Bond

The concept of “One Health” calls for the close integration of human, animal, environmental and ecosystem health. The first inklings of such an association can be traced back to the early days of the ancients, where healers often treated both humans and animals. In the 11th–13th centuries, the Chinese maintained a collaborative health program for both humans and animals. Later, in 18th century France, Claude Bourgelat, considered the father of veterinary education, recommended the comparative approach to human and animal medical science. In the 19th century, with the dawn of microbiology and cellular pathology, scientists such as Rudolf Virchow also advocated a comparative approach to link veterinary and human medicine. After this time, both human and veterinary medicine appeared to pursue separate paths and little interdisciplinary cooperation was noted in the early 20th century. Even though the term “one medicine” had been proposed sometime earlier, it was Calvin Schwabe’s recognition in 1976, of the close association between animal and human medicine that brings us to our current status of One Health.

First Case of Rabies Confirmed in Oregon for 2014

The first case of rabies in Oregon for 2014 has been confirmed in Lane County, as announced today by the Lane County Public Health. “All pet owners should make certain their dogs and cats are vaccinated against rabies. When our pets are protected from rabies, it provides a buffer zone of immune animals between humans and rabid wild animals such as foxes,” said Lane County Communicable Disease Supervisor, Cindy Morgan.

To check your records or schedule your pet’s vaccination please give us a call at 503-343-9735 today.